Your Words Matter

I love words.  The most prominent artwork in my home is beautifully poetic words, hung from room to room, reminding us of our truths.  The words in this photo hang over the crib in the nursery.  A piece from one of my favorite artists, House of Belonging, that captures my hopes and my dreams for my babies.

I believe in the power of words.  The words we speak to ourselves, matter.  The words we speak to others, matter.  Words have the power to call into being.  Our words call forth potential and possibility.  Words have the power to make people feel seen and known.  Our words hold belief for what could be.

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Grief & Loss: 4 Ways to Help Adoptive & Foster Kiddos Around the Holidays

Most of us have Christmas traditions. My family has quite a few. For example, we have a tradition for getting our Christmas tree. We trudge out into the snow and search high and low, waiting for the angelic light that would inevitably descend from the heavens to reveal our family Christmas tree. We blast the Canadian Tenors Christmas album on the way home as we drink our lukewarm apple cider (because you can’t keep anything warm during the winter in Canada). It was a magical time and one that holds many fond memories for me.

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David Vosburg
6 Months

6 months. Tomorrow our baby will be 6 months old. Not WOULD BE in the sense that he died, but IS in the fact that he’s very much alive.

It’s just I’m not the one who gets to feed him, rock him to sleep, calm him when he cries. In the days and weeks that followed I was so overcome with my grief that it was difficult to face the day. I found it difficult to face people, especially if it included telling them what had transpired because somehow as long as I just didn’t say it out loud, maybe it didn’t really happen.

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David Vosburg
Learning From Each Other

Brian and I have been married for 14 years and have five children. Adoption was a desire of both of ours before we even met, and after giving birth to two daughters, we began pursuing international adoption. God had different plans however, and after he dramatically changed my heart, we got our foster license. We fostered two little boys who were unable to return home and after caring for them for a couple years they became our sons. Their baby sister came to us at 4 days old and she too became a permanent part of our family shortly after her 2nd birthday.

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David Vosburg
Learning From Each Other

When the adoption agency called us at 10:00 at night to let us know that Elliot’s birth mom had signed right at the 72 hour mark instead of waiting until the next morning which was the original plan. The birth mom had told the agency that she wanted us to be able to go to bed that night knowing that he was going to be our son.

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David Vosburg
Learning From Each Other- Roxanne Engstrom

Our family is Jason and me (Roxanne), our 3 bio kids, and our Foster Daughter (FD). Our FD came to us 2 years ago after being in 4 other homes (many for a very short time) and after being removed from her home. It has been a difficult but awesome 2 years and we are all learning so much!

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David Vosburg
Learning From Each Other – Scott Roney

After bringing our son home, his (alleged) birthfather began the process of suing to obtain custody of him. This man’s only involvement in Judah-Jakori’s life had been to offer to pay for him to be aborted, but our lawyers told us we would probably lose. We felt completely helpless but many people were praying for us intensely. Everyone was shocked when the man failed the paternity test; to this day we can only surmise as to who our son’s birthfather is.

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David Vosburg
This Revolving Door Life

For a long time my husband and I complained that the adoption books didn’t have any answers for our family. When we adopted our daughter from Ethiopia we had read extensively, completed endless hours of online training and felt more than prepared to help her transition. But then she came home and instead of hoarding food, she wouldn’t eat. She didn’t flounder in transitioning between Amharic and English -she didn’t speak at all. For over 6 months we tried desperately to determine what was wrong, and only later discovered how severe her special needs were.

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David Vosburg